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Tuesday, April 8, 2014

The blog’s top ten most popular posts March 2014 from The Ancient Art of Bonsai.

1.- Bonsai Species Guides: Carmona Fukien Tea Bonsai.
Bonsai Species Guides: Carmona Fukien Tea Bonsai.
The Fukien Tea is an evergreen tree named after the Southeastern Chinese province of Fukien (Fuijan) where it originates. It has small dark-green shiny leaves that are covered with hairs and forms a very dense, compact habit. It has a light brown bark that forms a cracked, fissured appearance with age. In early Summer the Fukien Tea produces minute white flowers that go on to form small black
 
2.- Bonsai Species Guides: Rhododendron species Azalea.
Bonsai Species Guides: Rhododendron species Azalea.
The Rhododendron genus is massive and includes anything between 500-900 species depending on which authority you consider. Some species are so similar to others that they are listed as subspecies rather than distinct species in their own right, others are established hybrids (such as Kurume and Satsuki) that are sometimes regarded as species in their own right. Rhododendrons are deciduous or
 
3.- Bonsai Species Guides: Cedrus.
Bonsai Species Guides: Cedrus.
Cedrus is a genus of 4 species of monoecious, evergreen coniferous trees found in forest areas of the Western Himalayas and the Mediterranean. Needle-like foliage is arranged in clusters on short shoots, which develop new whorls each year. Species and varieties suitable for bonsai include: Cedrus atlantica / Atlas Cedar Fissured, silver-grey bark, produces roughly 4-sided darkgeen /glaucous
 
4.- National Bonsai and Penjing Museum: Virtual Tour.
National Bonsai and Penjing Museum: Virtual Tour.
The miniature masterpieces that we call bonsai and penjing are the pinnacle of gardening skill, and the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum has one of the largest collections of these timeless trees in North America. The Japanese art of bonsai, and its precursor, the Chinese art of penjing, are rooted in the traditions of Asian culture. The placement of branches, styling, and the pot all convey
 
5.- Crassula ovata/ Jade or Money Tree Bonsai
Crassula ovata/ Jade or Money Tree Bonsai
The Jade Tree is an evergreen succulent native to South Africa where it can reach heights of 2 metres or more. In temperate zones Jades are regarded as indoor trees and should not be subjected to temperatures below 5-7 degrees centigrade (41-45 F). The Jade has a thick trunk and branch structure with thick elliptic green succulent leaves. Given sufficient light the leaves develop red edges to
 
6.- The blog’s top ten most popular posts January 2014 from The Ancient Art of Bonsai.
The blog’s top ten most popular posts January 2014 from The Ancient Art of Bonsai.
1.- The Eight Immortals. Older than the art of bonsai is the art of shaping and firing clay. The very beginnings of mankind also mark the appearance of the very first bowl, not as a work of art, but as a means of survival. The prototype of a bowl is the shape of cupped hands, used to collect water or food. This prototype is still reflected today in the shapes of cups, plates and bowls. The
 
7.- The Eight Immortals.
The Eight Immortals.
Older than the art of bonsai is the art of shaping and firing clay. The very beginnings of mankind also mark the appearance of the very first bowl, not as a work of art, but as a means of survival. The prototype of a bowl is the shape of cupped hands, used to collect water or food. This prototype is still reflected today in the shapes of cups, plates and bowls. The symbolism of the cupped hand
 
8.- National Bonsai & Penjing Museum.
National Bonsai & Penjing Museum.
The miniature masterpieces that we call bonsai and penjing are the pinnacle of gardening skill, and the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum has one of the largest collections of these timeless trees in North America. The Japanese art of bonsai, and its precursor, the Chinese art of penjing, are rooted in the traditions of Asian culture. The placement of branches, styling, and the pot all convey deep
 
9.- Gallery: Junipers (Part 4).
Gallery: Junipers (Part 4).
This gallery is dedicated to the Juniper and those who cultivate, style, and display them. A constant companion of bonsaists everywhere, the Juniper plays an important role in bonsai, while offering some of the finest bonsai in the world for inspirations and enjoyment by all. Special thanks to Heather Hartman Coste, who did all the leg work for this gallery! We hope that you find the following
 
10.- Gallery: Junipers (Part 3).
Gallery: Junipers (Part 3).
This gallery is a continuation of our series of species specific galleries designed with the intention of creating a resource of inspiration as well as a source of enjoyment for all. It is our hope that those who favor the particular species featured and those who seek inspiration for designing bonsai of this species will find these galleries valuable and educational. Often the first bonsai ever
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Bonsai Species Guides: Carmona Fukien Tea Bonsai.

The Fukien Tea is an evergreen tree named after the Southeastern Chinese province of Fukien (Fuijan) where it originates.

It has small dark-green shiny leaves that are covered with hairs and forms a very dense, compact habit.

It has a light brown bark that forms a cracked, fissured appearance with age. In early Summer the Fukien Tea produces minute white flowers that go on to form small black berries.


In temperate regions the Fukien Tea is not hardy and are considered indoor trees for much of the year.

Though easily available at bonsai outlets, the Fukien Tea can be difficult to look after, particularly for beginners.
fukien_tea_leo_de_leon

Bonsai Species Guides: Rhododendron species Azalea.

The Rhododendron genus is massive and includes anything between 500-900 species depending on which authority you consider.

Some species are so similar to others that they are listed as subspecies rather than distinct species in their own right, others are established hybrids (such as Kurume and Satsuki) that are sometimes regarded as species in their own right.

Rhododendrons are deciduous or evergreen trees and shrubs from Australasia, N America, SW China, Tibet, Burma, N India and New Guinea.

They occur in many diverse habits, from dense forest to alpine tundra, and from sea-level to high altitude.

They vary greatly in habit, some can reach heights of 25metres whilst others creep at ground-level to form prostrate shrubs.
azalea bonsai

Bonsai Species Guides: Cedrus.

Cedrus is a genus of 4 species of monoecious, evergreen coniferous trees found in forest areas of the Western Himalayas and the Mediterranean.

Needle-like foliage is arranged in clusters on short shoots, which develop new whorls each year.

Species and varieties suitable for bonsai include:

Cedrus atlantica / Atlas Cedar

Fissured, silver-grey bark, produces roughly 4-sided darkgeen /glaucous blue pointed leaves to 2.5cm long.

Cedrus_atlantica-Glauca-Bonsai

National Bonsai and Penjing Museum: Virtual Tour.

The miniature masterpieces that we call bonsai and penjing are the pinnacle of gardening skill, and the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum has one of the largest collections of these timeless trees in North America.

The Japanese art of bonsai, and its precursor, the Chinese art of penjing, are rooted in the traditions of Asian culture. The placement of branches, styling, and the pot all convey deep symbolism and reverence for nature.

The National Bonsai & Penjing Museum, established in 1976, is the most comprehensive of its kind in North America.

It is dedicated to the display, education and scholarly study of bonsai and related art forms. The National Bonsai & Penjing Museum is undoubtedly one of Washington's key attractions for plant lovers.

BonsaiVirtualTourMap

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Crassula ovata/ Jade or Money Tree Bonsai

The Jade Tree is an evergreen succulent native to South Africa where it can reach heights of 2 metres or more. In temperate zones Jades are regarded as indoor trees and should not be subjected to temperatures below 5-7 degrees centigrade (41-45 F).

The Jade has a thick trunk and branch structure with thick elliptic green succulent leaves. Given sufficient light the leaves develop red edges to their leaves and produce clusters of star-shaped white flowers in Autumn.

Natural leaf size is 1-2" but can be reduced to as little as 1/2" with regular pruning. The Jade Tree is suitable for informal upright and clump styles in all sizes.

crassula small

General Cultivation: Jades should not be exposed to temperatures below 5-7 degrees centigrade and as a result are commonly grown indoors, though in warmer climates outdoor placement during summer is beneficial. Indoors, Jades should be placed as close to a natural source of light as possible, they will cope with poor light conditions though this will result in poor growth rate and increased leaf size.

Due to their arid natural habitat, Jade Trees are capable of holding large quantities of water in their leaves. Over watered specimen develop poor root systems which become incapable of physically supporting their heavy foliage and become top heavy. Unlike other bonsai species, Jade should be lightly watered, if the compost is allowed to dry in-between waterings the roots are encouraged to search for moisture creating a far stronger and vigorous root system. This also reduces the store of water in the foliage reducing the tendency to be top-heavy. Water is only essential to the plant when the leaves start to develop a wrinkled texture. In winter this can mean watering as little as once every 2-3 weeks.

Repotting: Jades should be repotted into fast draining inorganic compost every 2-3 years.

Fertilization: Stronger light encourages more vigorous growth than the use of fertilizers alone, a balanced feed once a month from mid-spring to Autumn is all the nutrients Jades require.

Pruning: New growth should be continually pinched out to encourage stronger lower growth and to reduce leaf-size. Jades readily make new growth from wounds and individual leaves can be removed to quickly produce new branches.

Never seal pruning wounds; wound sealents can trap moisture within the wound site and cause rotting. Leave pruning wounds open and allow to dry naturally.

Jades respond very well to trunk reduction techniques, producing new growth from the wound area within 1-2 weeks.

Wiring: Most enthusiasts don't bother wiring crassula, it simpler to shape this species by clipping and growing. however, Jades do respond to wiring, setting into new positions within 3-4 weeks depending on the vigour of the specimen. Beware though, as the bark marks very easily and can snap if bent too far. Wire loosely and bend branches a little at a time. Do not water the plant before wiring as turgid branches are far more likely to snap and mark.

Propagation: Cuttings can be taken at any time in sandy, well-drained compost. Even single leaves laid on the surface of the compost will strike.

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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

The blog’s top ten most popular posts January 2014 from The Ancient Art of Bonsai.

1.- The Eight Immortals.

The Eight Immortals.

Older than the art of bonsai is the art of shaping and firing clay. The very beginnings of mankind also mark the appearance of the very first bowl, not as a work of art, but as a means of survival. The prototype of a bowl is the shape of cupped hands, used to collect water or food. This prototype is still reflected today in the shapes of cups, plates and bowls. The symbolism of the cupped hand

More »

2.- National Bonsai & Penjing Museum.

National Bonsai & Penjing Museum.

The miniature masterpieces that we call bonsai and penjing are the pinnacle of gardening skill, and the National Bonsai & Penjing Museum has one of the largest collections of these timeless trees in North America. The Japanese art of bonsai, and its precursor, the Chinese art of penjing, are rooted in the traditions of Asian culture. The placement of branches, styling, and the pot all convey deep

More »

3.- Gallery: Junipers (Part 4).

Gallery: Junipers (Part 4).

This gallery is dedicated to the Juniper and those who cultivate, style, and display them. A constant companion of bonsaists everywhere, the Juniper plays an important role in bonsai, while offering some of the finest bonsai in the world for inspirations and enjoyment by all. Special thanks to Heather Hartman Coste, who did all the leg work for this gallery! We hope that you find the following

More »

4.- Gallery: Junipers (Part 3).

Gallery: Junipers (Part 3).

This gallery is a continuation of our series of species specific galleries designed with the intention of creating a resource of inspiration as well as a source of enjoyment for all. It is our hope that those who favor the particular species featured and those who seek inspiration for designing bonsai of this species will find these galleries valuable and educational. Often the first bonsai ever

More »

5.- Gallery: Junipers (Part 2).

Gallery: Junipers (Part 2).

This gallery is a continuation of our series of species specific galleries designed with the intention of creating a resource of inspiration as well as a source of enjoyment for all. It is our hope that those who favor the particular species featured and those who seek inspiration for designing bonsai of this species will find these galleries valuable and educational. Cultivars offer foliage

More »

6.- Gallery: Junipers (Part 1).

Gallery: Junipers (Part 1).

This gallery is dedicated to the Juniper and those who cultivate, style, and display them. A constant companion of bonsaists everywhere, the Juniper plays an important role in bonsai, while offering some of the finest bonsai in the world for inspirations and enjoyment by all. Special thanks to Heather Hartman Coste, who did all the leg work for this gallery! We hope that you find the following

More »

7.- The blog’s top ten most popular posts December 2013 from The Ancient Art of Bonsai.

The blog’s top ten most popular posts December 2013 from The Ancient Art of Bonsai.

1.- The blog’s top ten most popular posts December 2013 from The Ancient Art of Bonsai. Proper Care The Guide To Success With Bonsai Trees. Where do I put it?Pines and junipers go in full sun, while deciduous trees, such as maples and elms, will do well in a spot that gets some shade from late afternoon sun. Indoor, or tropical, trees will want quite a bit of sun. They are used to bright, humid

More »

8.- Proper Care The Guide To Success With Bonsai Trees.

Proper Care The Guide To Success With Bonsai Trees.

Where do I put it?Pines and junipers go in full sun, while deciduous trees, such as maples and elms, will do well in a spot that gets some shade from late afternoon sun. Indoor, or tropical, trees will want quite a bit of sun. They are used to bright, humid climates found near the equator. If the Summers where you live are hot and arid, you must be careful that your trees do not dry out. You

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9.- Species Guide by Common name.

Species Guide by Common name.

These Species guides have been developed by a number of people putting in hours of dedicated work to bring together a valuable guide to Bonsai enthusiast - acknowledgement of the authors are on each page. Find the species below and click on the link to be taken to the guide for that particular tree Bald Cypress. The following are links to INDIVIDUAL PAGES of species: Acacia American red maple

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10.- Tools for The Beginning Bonsai Artist.

Tools for The Beginning Bonsai Artist.

Those who are newly interested in the art of bonsai are often unsure about what tools are necessary to begin developing their bonsai skills. Three or four basic tools will equip one to perform most of the tasks necessary to produce and maintain an intermediate to advanced bonsai collection. It is the intent of this article to discuss the useful characteristics of basic tools and some of the

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